Here you can find the most Frequently Asked Questions!

How do I measure my floor?

Unless you know the size of your room you aren’t going to know how much you need to order.

If you have a rectangular room, these are the easiest – simply measure the length & the width of the room (longest sections of the room including set back cupboard spaces or kitchen appliance for example) then multiply them together!  For example 6.00m x 3.00 = 18.00m²

 

If your room isn’t rectangular then we advise splitting each section off and measuring them individually.  See below.

If you have a room that is overly complicated then follow the same methods as above and follow the diagram below.

Which floor is best for which room?

Which Floor Is Best For Which Room?

How to calculate how many design/feature strips I need?

How To Calculate How Many Design/Feature Strips I Need?

Calculating the number of design strips you need to enhance your floor can seem very daunting at first. But as long as you know the size of both your tiles and your room, we’ll help you figure out the quantity you need in four easy steps.

Calculate the size of your room.
Luckily, we’ve already put together a guide on how to do this easily here.

Calculate how many packs of flooring you’re buying.
This couldn’t be easier, simply find your floor on our site, and type in the area of your room in the grey box on the product page itself. Our website will calculate the number of packs you need.

Find your tile size
Find the dimensions in the table below which match your choice of floor. If you’re not sure about your tile size, it’ll be in the Specification section of the product page, where it says “Dimensions”.

Calculate your strips.
Grab a calculator and multiply the number of boxes you’re buying by the number in the right hand column – this is the number of boxes of design strips you need to buy. Design strips only come in full boxes, so remember to round up to the next whole number.

Polyflor (50 Strips per box)

Size of Tile (mm)
Boxes of strips
per box of tiles:
305 x 305 tile0.48
457 x 457 tile0.32
305 x 610 tile0.36
305 x 914 tile0.32
457 x 914 tile0.25

 

Karndean (25 Strips per box)

Size of Tile (mm)
Boxes of strips
per box of tiles:
305 x 305 tile0.97
407 x 407 tile0.71
305 x 457 tile0.80
457 x 457 tile0.64
457 x 610 tile0.56

Please note, these numbers do not account for waste or any other jobsite conditions that may influence actual quantities required to complete your design floor.

Which floors can you use with underfloor heating?

Which Floors Can You Use With Underfloor Heating?

Underfloor heating is a wonderful and efficient heating system. However, the design of it means it’s in close contact with the floor. Because of this, not every floor can be laid over underfloor heating.

It’s fine to use engineered, laminate and luxury vinyl tiles, as these floors are all designed to cope with dramatic changes in temperature. However, it’s always worth double checking with the product manufacturer, and remember that no floor should be exposed to temperatures above 27 degrees celsius.

Solid wood is not so suitable. The reasons you can’t use solid wood floors with underfloor heating is that the high heats can dry it out, causing it to shrink and creating gaps in the floor. When the heating goes off again, the wood reabsorbs moisture and expands, which can make it swell and buckle.

Unfortunately, our natural carpets are also not guaranteed against underfloor heating.

 

Hints & Tips

 

  • The heat needs to be spread evenly across the floor, with no hotspots.
  • Floors must be laid close to the subfloor, with no gaps between the layers so the floor doesn’t dry out.
  • The relative humidity of the room should be less than 60% both during and after the installation.
  • Be aware that Beech and Maple floors react more dramatically to heat so will experience more movement than other species.
  • Our paper felt underlay has the lowest amount of thermal resistance. Thin foam underlays (2mm-3mm thick) can be used too but steer clear of fibreboard or thick acoustic underlays as these will reduce the efficiency of the underfloor heating system. Regardless of which underlay you choose, make sure it has a Damp Proof Membrane to cope with the moisture from changing temperatures.

Which floors can I use in my bathroom?

Which Floors Can I Use In My Bathroom?

 

Luxury Vinyl Tiles

All our Luxury Vinyl Tiles (LVT) are completely waterproof. Being an artificial material, vinyl simply won’t react with the water, which means you’ll never have to worry about moisture damage to your bathroom floor.

Shop our LVT range 🛒

Laminate Flooring

Laminate flooring has a pretty good resistance to moisture, but splashes can seep in over time if they’re not dried up, so make sure you dry up spills straight away. If you’re looking for a low-maintenance floor, the Quickstep Impressive range is a 100% waterproof laminate floor – the only one of its kind!

Shop our Laminate range 🛒

Real Wood & Natural Carpets

If you’re after real wood (solid or engineered) or natural carpet floors, we’d recommend against them. Over time real wood flooring could warp in the changing moisture and our natural carpets can be weakened by water.

Shop our Wood range 🛒

Shop our Carpet range 🛒

Which floors can I use in my Kitchen?

Which Floors Can I Use In My Kitchen?

 

Luxury Vinyl Tiles

All our Luxury Vinyl Tiles (LVT) are completely waterproof. As they are made from PVC, vinyl simply won’t react with the water. They are also tough enough to tolerate the high traffic without denting or scratching due to their tough wear layer. In short, LVT is the toughest kitchen floor we have on offer.

Shop our LVT range 🛒

Laminate Flooring

Laminate flooring is tough against scratches and fairly resistant to moisture, but splashes can seep in over time so remember to dry up splashes as soon as possible! If you’re looking for a low-maintenance kitchen floor, our Quickstep Impressive range is a 100% waterproof laminate floor with an ultra-realistic textured finish – perfect for your kitchen.

Shop our Laminate range 🛒

Real Wood / Natural Carpets

If you’re after solid wood or natural carpet floors, we’d recommend against them for the kitchen. Solid wood flooring can warp in the changing moisture and our Natural Carpets can be weakened by the water. Oiled engineered floors aren’t suitable as they offer less moisture resistance than lacquered floors.

If you’re really set on the luxury of a real wood kitchen floor, lacquered engineered boards are your best bet, as the finish will help them resist splashes and engineered floors are designed to withstand changing temperatures. Always dry up splashes straightaway.

Shop our Wood range 🛒

Shop our Carpet range 🛒